Understanding Pain for Better Clinical Practice, A Psychological Perspective

Understanding Pain for Better Clinical Practice

A Psychological Perspective

By Steven James Linton, Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Orebro University Hospital, Orebro, Sweden


PART I: THE PSYCHOLOGY OF PAIN PERCEPTION AND BEHAVIOR
Chapter 1 The need to understand the psychology of pain
Chapter 2 Models of pain perception
Chapter 3 The biological-psychological interface: Pain perception
Chapter 4 Attending to pain stimuli: Vigilance and Distraction
Chapter 5 Emotions and the experience of pain
Chapter 6 Interpreting pain signals: Cognitions
Chapter 7 Learning to cope: Behavior in pain and health
Chapter 8 An integrated model
PART II: IMPLICATIONS FOR CLINICAL PRACTICE
Chapter 9 Why does chronic pain develop?
Chapter 10 Communicating with patients
Chapter 11 Managing the first visit
Chapter 12 Early identification of "at risk" patients: screening
Chapter 13 Early intervention
Chapter 14 The way forward

Appendix Session manual for therapist's: Cognitive-behavioral early intervention for groups